Depression: Evaluating Your Activities

A familiar childhood fairy tale is “The Three Little Pigs.” Each pig builds his house out of a different material in order to protect himself from the huffing and puffing of the big, bad wolf. The house made out of straw is the one made of brick. Even though it takes more time and work, the brick house is seen as worth the effort because it provides lasting protection.

How does this relate to depression? By examining your life patterns and making positive changes requires your time and effort, but doing so is like building your personal house out of brick. By making changes, and understanding the need for those changes, you are construction—brick by brick—a strong, resilient house that can stand up to the huffing and puffing of life’s storms.

While constructing your house with brick, you’ll also need to remove some of the inferior materials you’ve used to patch weak spots. Remember, this restructuring process will not diminish you but make you stronger. Consider this process of taking stock of your life as your own personal remodeling project.

As you spend time thinking about the activities you are currently engaged in, and whether or not those activities are filling or draining, the key to these activities is in finding a healthy balance for you. This will depend upon your personality, your stage in life, and your unchangeable life factors. You may be the sort of person who simply needs more time to be inactive or still than others seem to need. Or you may be the kind of person who is energized by activity and interaction.

While it is possible to alter your personality to some degree, each of us has individual traits that we need to factor into our activities. We are not alike, and the same activity or activity level will affect us differently. Some of the many positive outcomes from overcoming depression can be a deeper understanding of your personality, insight into what characteristics you want to enhance and strengthen, and knowledge of what aspects you are ready to change or let go.

In balancing your activities, be aware of any that are negative and occur frequently. These are activities you will want to evaluate for change.

It may not be possible for you to completely eliminate a significant draining activity in your life, but it is possible to evaluate that activity and intentionally purpose to find ways to make that activity include filling moments. Sometimes the filling aspects of a draining activity come from the relationships you build with others as you go through that activity. Don’t overlook the silver lining of friendships in the storm clouds of life.

As you continue to evaluate your list of activities, look for filling activities that occur infrequently. Determine whether or not you are able to increase the frequency of these activities. Is there any way to engage in a similar activity that will also be personally filling? You may take an art class once a week that is personally rewarding but are not able to devote the time for another class. You can, however, get outside and walk through your neighborhood, letting nature’s canvas inspire you for that one class you can take. It is amazing how such small changes can add optimism, hope, and joy to your life. Moving forward doesn’t always happen in giant leaps. Sometimes, the most significant progress is made in a series of small steps.

If someone you know is suffering from depression, remember that it’s important to seek professional guidance when diagnosing and treating depression. For more information about depression treatment, fill out this form or call 1-888-747-5592 to speak confidentially with a specialist today. The Center • A Place of HOPE was recently ranked as a Top 10 facility in the country for the treatment of depression, and our team is standing by to help you and your loved ones.

Finding True Joy in Forgiveness

For some people, their pain and hurt are so deep inside of them that their ability to forgive is buried under layers of anger and resentment. If this description fits you, you will need to search outside of yourself for the strength to forgive. Again, you need to understand that forgiveness is something you can rarely accomplish immediately. You’ve lived with your pain for many years; allow yourself the time you need to work through your need to forgive.

Your eating disorder is a response to your pain and anger. If you can understand what happened, get past the anger, and forgive the pain, the reason for your behavior will no longer exist. When the reason no longer exists, and the health-related complications of your behavior are addressed, true healing becomes a reality.

Getting past your roadblocks to forgiveness, and learning to practice proactive forgiveness, are critical components to your healing journey. Below are seven joys of to keep in mind when working towards forgiveness:

  1. Forgiveness allows you to reclaim your personal happiness and find release from bondage to debilitating emotions.
  1. Forgiveness allows you to reclaim intimacy in your relationships by giving you closure over the painful ones so you can truly enjoy the healing ones.
  1. Forgiveness allows you to seek out appropriate forms of comfort.
  1. Forgiveness allows you to truly throw out those harmful emotions instead of storing and recycling them.
  1. Forgiveness allows you to refresh your mind by improving your self-esteem and realizing the awesome ability to forgive that lies within you.
  1. Forgiveness allows you the freedom to seek your true potential unencumbered by your eating disorder.
  1. Forgiveness allows you to amplify your strengths and gifts over your weaknesses.

Make a decision to decide to forgive. Do this not because you want to, not because it feels good, and not because it’s deserved, but because it is the healing thing for you to do. A conscious choice on your part to forgive can counteract your conscious decision to continue in the behaviors of your eating disorder or disordered eating. Your will is the same, but you are choosing to use it in a healthy, uplifting way.

Make the decision to invest in the rest of your life. Please call one of our caring, licensed depression treatment specialist now at 1-888-771-5166 / 425-771-5166. It is a free, confidential call where you can get all of your questions answered and discuss what an individualized treatment program might look like for you.

How a Good Night’s Rest Affects Depression

A good night’s rest is not something you do; it’s something you experience.   Depression interferes with the healthy production and operation of serotonin and melatonin, neurotransmitters used for the body’s sleep-wake cycle. As you work toward recovery from depression, you will want to assist your body in any way you can to achieve this restful sleep.

Try intentionally preparing for rest. This means allowing your body and your mind time to transition into sleep. Far too many of us carry on a stress-filled day right up to the time we climb into bed and then expect sleep to automatically arrive. This winding-down period could consist of listening to relaxing music, reading for enjoyment, listening to soothing natural sounds on an MP3 player or CD, or quiet meditation.

Give yourself enough time to get adequate rest. Eight hours, granted, is an average, but be aware of when your body might require more sleep. Anytime the body is under stress, physical or emotional, it will require more rest to rebuild and replenish. Five to six hours a night is probably not going to provide what you need. Resting adequately may require you to make choices about activities so you can establish a healthy routine of getting to bed on time.

Establish a set time to go to bed each night, whether weekdays or weekends. Studies show that it is far better for your sleep cycle to go to bed and get up each day at approximately the same time. You are helping your body to establish a biorhythm. If you swing from ten o’clock one night to two o’clock the next, your body is under stress having to adjust to wide swings of time. Do yourself a favor and find a time that works well for each day of the week, and then stick with it.

Cut out caffeine in the late afternoon and evening hours. Caffeine, as a stimulant, can interfere with your body’s ability to know when it is actually tired. Instead of drinking coffee or caffeinated soda at dinner, drink some of your water or an herbal tea.

Reduce the activity, noise, and light levels as you go into the evening hours. Televisions blaring, lights blazing, and people running around frantically at ten o’clock at night is not conducive to rest. Start turning off lights, turning down volumes, and putting away activities as the evening progresses.

Another way you can help your body relax and ease into sleep is by not eating late in the evening. Evening snacking leaves food in your stomach that must be digested, and your entire body cannot fully rest if your digestive system stays up late to process your ten o’clock snack. One exception can be a small cup of hot tea, the kind that promotes a calming emotional effect.

Authored by Dr. Gregory Jantz, founder of The Center • A Place of HOPE and author of 29 books. Pioneering whole-person care nearly 30 years ago, Dr. Jantz has dedicated his life’s work to creating possibilities for others, and helping people change their lives for good. The Center • A Place of HOPE, located on the Puget Sound in Edmonds, Washington, creates individualized programs to treat behavioral and mental health issues, including eating disorders, addiction, depression, anxiety and others.

Coming Out of the Darkness

One of the remarkable similarities of those who suffer from depression is the common image of darkness they use to describe their depression. In an effort to articulate the unexplainable, they speak in terms of feeling burdened, weighed down, and oppressed. The overwhelming reality of depression manifests itself in recurring themes of despair and hopelessness. Though each individual may take a different route into that despair, the description of a hollowed-out destination of helplessness is universal.

The whole-person approach recognizes these individual paths to depression, its universal signatures, and the reality of individual routes to recovery. In helping each person to identify and work toward his or her recovery, the whole-person approach acknowledges and addresses the common emotional contributors to depression. We are emotional beings, and whatever the reason for the depression, its expression comes through our emotional state.

When a person is depressed, it is vital to discover the emotional roots such as anger, fear, and guilt that firmly lock depression into a person’s mind-set. Something is arguing against optimism, hope, and joy. In order to address the emotional component of depression, the root cause must be uncovered, understood, and addressed in a positive, healing way.

Taking a multidimensional approach to recovery increases the rate of success. While some use medication alone to get a handle on their depression, research shows a higher degree of healing occurs when therapy is combined with medication. Therapy or counseling provides individuals with a safe place to talk about feelings and discuss past and current events in life that have contributed to who they are now. Therapists can also make suggestions about positive actions people can integrate into their lives.

At The Center • A Place of HOPE, we have found that when the whole-person approach is utilized, including an understanding of the body and the appropriate use of medication, the rates of recovery are further enhanced. We strive to include the physical, spiritual, mental and emotional elements of each individual into the recovery process. Also, because each person’s story and situation is unique, we create unique recovery plans for each person that comes to The Center.

If someone you know is suffering from depression, remember that it’s important to seek professional guidance when diagnosing and treating depression. For more information about depression treatment, fill out this form or call 1-888-747-5592 to speak confidentially with a specialist today. The Center • A Place of HOPE Depression Treatment Facility was recently ranked as the #1 treatment facility in the country for depression, and our team is standing by to help you and your loved ones.

 

Healing Depression with Whole-Person Care

Applying the whole-person approach to recovery can individualize treatment for depression. This approach is based upon recognition of the unique components of an individual’s life and how they interweave to form the whole person. Below, we will explain each aspect of the whole-person approach and how, taken together, they can identify real answers to curing depression.

Emotional Influences

We are emotional beings, and we choose to acknowledge or express those emotions in outward forms. We are never far from our feelings and emotions. They trip us up when we are stressed or tired. They sneak up on us at unexpected moments. They support our expectations, fuel our disappointments, and energize our victories.

When depression settles into a person’s life, emotions become confused. A promotion at work may produce thoughts of despair and fear. Minor daily irritants can become major life hurdles. The joy of others can become a gloomy reminder of inner insecurities. Even if life appears to be going well, our emotional balance can become tilted toward depression.

Environmental Influences

We live in a world where complexity greets us every morning. What are we going to wear? What are we going to eat? How are we going to arrive at work? Which task are we going to complete? What call are we going to deal with first? Should we answer our cell phone, our home phone, respond to our e-mail, reply to our voice mail—and in what order? From the moment we awake, the assault begins. We are overwhelmed. The assault demands a response, and retreating into depression can be that response.

Relational Influences

We constantly use our personal relationships to determine our position in life. We observe the world and people around us, and we make decisions about who we are based on how we believe others perceive us. We define our position by the people with whom we interact. Then, we use this information to triangulate our state of well-being, factoring in what we’ve learned or observed in the past, a view of our present circumstances, and the potential outcome for our future.

Depending on our ability to reason truthfully, these relationships provide us with a sense of well-being or foreboding. The uniqueness of our circumstances and our relationships can either help or hinder our ability to deal with these ever-present thoughts and emotions.

Physical Influences

In the past, the answer to a broken-down spirit was a pharmaceutical fix that relaxed the physical body. But as we learn more and more about the interworkings of mind, body, and spirit, we are discovering that the potential exists for our bodies to act as a partner in recovery, instead of as an opponent.

Spiritual Influences

Wrestling with questions of worth and purpose is a spiritual issue. Who am I? What is my purpose? Where is joy? When will this be over? Why is this happening? How did I get this way? The spiritual component of a person’s life can provide direction toward both the right questions and the needed answers.

At The Center • A Place of HOPE, we look at each individual’s emotional, environmental, relational, physical, and spiritual history and health. Together, these elements provide keys to understanding why a person is depressed and opens a doorway to his or her recovery. Whole-person care is the foundation of our practice. If you or a loved one are suffering from depression and are ready to find true recovery and joy, fill out this form or call 1-888-747-5592 to speak confidentially with a specialist today.

 

 

Finding Purpose in Your Life

Over the years, it is possible for the activities and responsibilities of life to layer one on top of another. The combined weight of all these activities and responsibilities can be crushing. One of the first things to do in taking stock of your life is to look at what you are doing.

Think about all of the things that you do daily, weekly, monthly, and otherwise periodically. Think about your reasons for engaging in each of your activities. What are those reasons? Are they still valid today? Are your reasons for engaging in each activity the same today as they were when you started? Have the reasons changed? Have you changed?

This is an intentional, purposeful look at the activities that build up your life, including family, work, recreational, religious, and community. It is possible, over time, for an activity to become unhinged from its original reason. If your life is filled with too many activities separated from the reasons for doing them, then it is possible for you to feel that your life is futile. You might feel that what you are doing and how hard you are working and make little difference. Life can seem busy and burdensome yet without purpose.

This outlook can be a major factor in environmental causes of depression. As you look over your activities and how you are feeling about your life, what you are looking for is twofold: the first is the number of activities, and the second is the overall effect those activities have on your life. Depression can occur when the amount of activities are either too great or too small. If you are engaged in too many activities, your life can become a blur of motion without any real substance, and depression can result. Benjamin Franklin said, “Do not confuse motion with action.” If you are engaged in too few worthwhile activities, and have isolated and insulated yourself from outside relationships, this motion without action can result in depression.

Depression can occur when your activities are out of balance in the following ways:

  • You have too many activities, and the sum of them outweighs their individual value. When you’ve got too many things going collectively, you are too busy to enjoy any of them individually.
  • You may have activities but too few worthwhile ones. When the sum of your activities is draining, the draining ones interfere with the worthwhile ones.
  • You have too few activities in your life. When you’re bigger activity is inactivity, you rob yourself of the stimulation and engagement of purpose and people.

You may find that you are simply too busy. If so, you need to evaluate which activities to continue and which activities to let go. Or perhaps you have isolated yourself from meaningful, worthwhile activities and will need to stretch and expand yourself. This may mean giving up some activities so you’ll have time to integrate more worthwhile ones into your schedule. Intentionally changing the pace of your life can help you move forward in the recovery from depression. By evaluating the substance of your activities, you can make informed decisions about which ones to add, which ones to support, and which ones to let go.

If you or someone you love is struggling with depression caused by grief, The Center • A Place of HOPE can help. In addition to physical, mental, and emotional treatment of depression, The Center • A Place of HOPE offers Christian support to address the spiritual components and struggles in a person’s life that affect grief and depression. For more information, fill out this form or call 1-888-747-5592 to speak confidentially with a depression recovery specialist today.

 

Excerpts of this blog were taken from Dr. Gregory Jantz’s book Turing Your Down into Up: A Realistic Plan for Healing from Depression.

 

 

 

 

 

Become an Active Participant in Life

“God grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, courage to change the things I can, and wisdom to know the difference.”

To paraphrase the famous Serenity Prayer, it is so important to recognize those things in our lives that we can change and those things that we cannot. While there may be a great deal in your own life that you cannot change, you may be surprised at how many things you can. One of the keys to overcoming depression is to honestly and realistically evaluate your life. Then, develop a plan to accept those things that are possible. This requires taking stock of your life. Just as a storekeeper takes an inventory of all that he has, it is wise for us to make a tangible list of our physical, mental, and spiritual assets and liabilities. Make a list in your responsibilities; write down what you want to do or be in addition to what you have already done or become. Consider what needs to happen (or stop happening) to fulfill your hopes and aspirations.

You may be reluctant to do this exercise for fear that it will make you even more depressed. But the objective of taking stock is not to create an inventory of all the things that are wrong with your life. Rather, taking stock will help to categorize the changeable and unchangeable things in your life to intentionally more forward, out of depression.

Too often, we live our lives feeling like spectators instead of active participants with the power to choose our own course. We get caught up in life’s low, whether good, bad, or neutral. Wherever the currents take us, we go. It’s as if we are on autopilot, but depression happens when our autopilot gets stuck in a negative descent. Unless we take intentional action, chances are that circumstances won’t force a change to the positive.

In other words, if you go along waiting for some “thing,” or some event to alter the course of your depression, you’ll probably be disappointed. It’s time too take control and look at where you are in your life. It’s time to actively and intentionally participate in the course of your life.

If the prospect of taking inventory of your life is overwhelming, and you don’t even know where to begin, The Center • A Place of HOPE can help. Our team of depression specialists can not only help you take the first step towards recovery, but they can guide you every step of the way. If you are ready to begin your journey, fill out this form or call 1-888-747-5592 to speak with a depression recovery specialist today.

Excerpts of this blog were taken from Dr. Gregory Jantz’s book Turing Your Down into Up: A Realistic Plan for Healing from Depression.

 

Depression Fighting Foods

Stressed out, cranky, or down in the dumps? Are you looking for natural ways to assist with your depression recovery? Try adjusting your diet. Specific dietary changes can help you maintain energy, focus, and de-stress, helping to alleviate the blues. Below is a list of nutrients and specific foods that are proven mood-boosters.

Complex Carbs: Complex carbohydrates are metabolized most slowly and prevent mood-depleting energy crashes. Replacing simple carbohydrates, such as white bread, with foods containing quinoa, wheat germ, or amaranth can help get you through the day. These foods also tend to be higher in protein, which keeps you fuller and better focused.

Chromium: Certain nutrient deficiencies can directly alter neurological function and affect your mood. Some of these, such as chromium, can directly impact the hormonal changes that contribute to a bad mood. Studies have shown that chromium plays a significant role in increasing levels of important hormones involved in mood regulation, such as serotonin and norepinephrine. Chromium-rich foods include broccoli and grape juice.

Folate: Folate is another important nutrient involved in serotonin regulation, and it has been used in conjunction with vitamin B12 to assist with depression. Leafy greens, asparagus, and brussel sprouts are high in folate.

Iron: Iron deficiency can also contribute to fatigue and depression. While many foods are now fortified with iron, red meats, lentils, and beans are all great natural sources of iron.

Magnesium: Magnesium is another key nutrient involved in maintaining a healthy body. However, magnesium deficiency can also contribute to irritability due to its role in serotonin production. Incorporating magnesium-rich foods such as dark leafy greens, nuts, and seeds, can help balance serotonin levels.

Omega-3 Fatty Acids: Omega-3 fatty acids are also essential in maintaining a healthy brain, and consumption has been linked to decreased rates of depression and mood swings. Although fish is notorious for being rich in omega-3s, flaxseeds, chia seeds, and walnuts are also great vegetarian sources.

B Vitamins: Vitamins B6 and B12 can also assist in energy and mood stability. B6 is involved in neurotransmitter production, responsible for regulating mood and emotions. Meat, nuts, and lentils are all high in vitamin B6. Vitamin B12 is involved in nerve function and can be found in meat, eggs, and cheese. B Vitamins can also effectively be consumed as in a supplement form.

Shifting your diet can be a great way to manage all sorts of physical and emotional ailments—including depression. For many people, however, depression recovery requires more than just diet changes. True healing requires a broader, more holistic approach. Our team at The Center • A Place of HOPE specializes in the holistic treatment of depression, and we are here to help. The Center • A Place of HOPE has been ranked as the #1 treatment facility for depression in the United States. Our expert dietitians work alongside the rest of our team to create individualized treatment programs that address the physical, emotional, mental and spiritual dimensions of recovery. If you are ready to regain true joy and happiness and overcome your depression, fill out this form or call 1-888-747-5592 to speak with a depression recovery specialist today.

 

Source:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/national/health-science/10-nutrients-that-can-lift-your-spirits/2014/01/14/05f4e514-7a4d-11e3-b1c5-739e63e9c9a7_story.html

Mastering Your Mood

One of the skills we teach clients is mood mastery, or how to choose their mood. All of us have a profusion of moods at our disposal at any given time. So often, we choose negative moods simply because we’ve formed a habit of submitting to their strong presence. We’ve allowed them to take shortcuts to the forefront of our moods.

Mood mastery is akin to choosing your attitude. Mood and attitude are linked; they are interrelated but separate. Mood is how we are feeling; attitude is how we respond to the mood. Choosing our attitude, our response to the mood, is one way we can actively achieve mastery over any mood. No matter what mood we initially experience, our attitude can either reinforce that mood or cause us to choose another.

Let’s be clear. Choosing a mood is not about reacting to an event or circumstance. Things happen and each of us will have a natural reaction, such as a surprise or anxiety, that may be similar to the way anyone else might react. It is what happens next that falls under the category of choosing our mood. After our initial reaction, we have the opportunity to review that reaction. Then, we can intentionally respond with a continuation of that reaction, or respond with one of our other mood choices.

Here’s a common, everyday example: We’re in our car on the way to work. Maybe we’re running a little big late. All of a sudden, the car next to us swerves into our lane, cutting us off. Our reaction is probably one of shock and surprise. It may even be anger. It’s upsetting when we feel endangered or surprised by the irresponsible action of another driver.

What happens next, however, is a choice. We can choose to take a deep breath and back off the bumper of that car, realizing it would probably be a good idea to give a little bit more room between that driver and ourselves. In other words, we can choose to respond intelligently.

We can also choose to respond angrily. An extreme example of this response has the name road rage. It begins when the actions, real or perceived, of another driver produces an angry, aggressive response. Even if it doesn’t go as far as road rage, we can still respond by using that event to fuel a bad mood. We can choose to react to that event by remaining angry about it long after the fact.

If an event such as getting cut off on the roadway can produce a day-ruining reaction, it’s not surprising that other, more serious or traumatic events can lead to a sustained bad mood lasting months or even years. Once people understand this concept, we work to support them in expanding the moods they choose from when responding to life.

Here are a few techniques to help you master your mood, regardless of what situation life presents to you:

  1. Practice Gratitude: When confronted with a challenging situation or just a “bad mood,” instead of dwelling on the negative situation, refocus to think about five things you are grateful for in your life. If you can think of a gratitude directly linked to the seemingly negative situation at hand, even better!
  2. Breathe Deeply: Before your emotions carry you away, stop and take ten, slow deep breaths. This will send oxygen throughout your body, physically calming you and putting you in a better state to deal with the situation positively.
  3. Get Active: As you probably know, exercise can be a great, natural mood booster, triggering the release of mood-boosting endorphins.
  4. Go Outside: Nature has an amazing affect on our mood, vitality, and overall health. Spending time outdoors and in nature has been proven to boost your serotonin levels and improve your mood.
  5. Help Someone: Sometimes the best thing to do when you are feeling upset, angry, or down is to do something for someone else. Find an opportunity to give of yourself, even in a small way, to help someone. Whether it is opening the door, buying someone a coffee, or paying someone a compliment, these small acts of kindness can sometimes have a greater affect on the giver than the receiver.
  6. Smile: Even if you have to fake a smile at first, try it anyways!

A good mood allows you to experience life in its fullest. But sometimes a good mood doesn’t come naturally, while unconstructive moods do. To overcome bad moods and negative thought patterns, you must turn the flow of this negative tide and strive, even if it seems like you’re paddling against a strong current, to promote optimism, hope, and joy. Once you begin putting good energy out into the world, you’ll be amazed what you’ll get in return!

The Center • A Place of HOPE has been consistently ranked among the top treatment facilities in the country for depression. If you or a loved on are struggling to overcome negative feelings and depression, call 1-888-771-5166 / 425-771-5166 to talk with our team of specialists.

Excerpts of this blog were taken from Dr. Gregory Jantz’s book Turing Your Down into Up: A Realistic Plan for Healing from Depression.

 

The Importance of Self-Talk When Overcoming Depression

The relationships around you can oftentimes influence your struggle with depression. But before you continue examining others, pause for a moment and take a good, deep look at you. Perhaps the most fundamental relationship you have is not with someone else it is with yourself. Though you interact with others, you are also in constant communication with yourself through self-talk. This inner dialogue sets the stage for how you respond to life.

When you are depressed, your self-talk can become one-sided, centered on negative dialogue of despair, regrets, frustration, confusion, and doubts. The voice of forgiveness is rarely heard, and the chorus of optimism, hope, and joy are drowned out. Take some time to think about how you treat yourself. Are you your own drainer or filler? Do you make it a habit of pointing out the positive? Or is your self-talk a constant stream of emphasizing the negative? How do you talk to yourself when you make a mistake? How do you talk to yourself when negative circumstances occur?

If your self-talk is out of balance, your ability to maintain a healthy relationship with yourself is compromised. It becomes difficult to escape the constant chatter of negativity inside your own head. Even more devastating, the more we think a certain way, the more likely we are to believe ourselves, manifesting our thoughts into reality.

Escaping this pattern of negative self-talk is a great challenge, and requires a consistent, long-term effort. It begins with simply observing your thoughts. Throughout the course of the day, try to step outside yourself and be an onlooker to your stream of consciousness. What types of thoughts are you having? Where do they come from? Where do they lead? Are they primarily positive or negative? Try not to pass any judgment on your thoughts, but just observe them as they pass through. Having awareness of your thoughts is an important first step towards shifting your thought patterns.

The next step in working toward a healthier relationship with yourself is through more realistic and truthful self-talk. There is great value in acknowledging and affirming the truth, both about situations and about yourself. By focusing on objective truths, you are able to avoid any subjective, and oftentimes negative, judgments.

Finally, another strategy to help improve the quality of your self-talk is to focus on the things you’re grateful for. When you observe your thoughts wandering towards negativity, don’t get angry with yourself. Instead, stop whatever you’re doing and think about something or someone that you are grateful for. This will immediately divert your mind from negative self-talk and redirect it towards the uplifting, positive aspects of your life.

Overcoming depression requires a multifaceted approach—both internally and externally. While there are many thought patterns that you can shift internally to help shake the feeling of depression, oftentimes people struggling with depression need external help. At The Center • A Place of HOPE, we understand the importance of holistic treatment,  If you or a loved one are struggling with depression, call to get the help you deserve.